Detail View: Costume History: Master of Ceremonies

Work Record ID: 
14176
Work Type: 
prints (visual works)
Title: 
Master of Ceremonies
Title Alternative: 
Master of Ceremonies [for Futteh Ali Shah]
Measurements: 
17.5 cm x 10 cm
Material: 
paper
Material: 
ink
Material: 
pigment
Technique: 
engraving
Technique: 
hand-painted
Cultural Context: 
Persian (culture)
Date Original: 
1845
Location: 
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA
Repository: 
Western Michigan University, Libraries, Kalamazoo, Michigan, USA
Call number: 
DS 258 .S55 1845
Style Period: 
Qajar
Subject-LCNA: 
Shoberl, Frederic, 1775-1853
Subject-LCSH: 
Clothing and dress--Iran
Subject-LCSH: 
Public officers
Subject-AAT: 
robes (main garments)
Subject-AAT: 
turbans
Subject-AAT: 
slippers (shoes)
Subject-AAT: 
cummerbunds
Subject-AAT: 
walking sticks
Subject-TGM: 
Government officials
Subject-TGN: 
Iran (nation)
Subject-Keywords: 
robes, government officials, master of ceremonies
Relation: 
Engraving after original Persian drawing; electronic version of an earlier edition available through Google Books: http://books.google.com/books?id=TRoPAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA114&lpg=PA114&dq=Shoberl+Persia&source=bl&ots=r9Rm4TUica&sig=xITq8JpHMqt163FajgCMkQwXDFM&
Description: 
P. 34 "The second officer is the Ichic-Agasee, whom Morier calls the master of ceremonies: he superintends the porters, ushers, door-keepers, and other officers of that class belonging to the palace.  Before him is borne a gold stick covered with precious stones, which is the mark of his dignity: and when the king quits his seraglio, he takes it in this hand, standing at some distance of his majesty's person, and endeavoring to anticipate his commands from his looks." P. 62-63 "This is not the only occasion on which the khilauts is conferred: it is given by the king, in token of his approbation or favor, to such of his own subjects as are deemed deserving of the honour, and to ambassadors or other foreigners who visit his court.  it's quality, and the number of articles of which it is composed, differ with the rank and favor of the receiver. A common khilauts consists of a caba or coat; a kemerbund, or zone; a gouchpeesh, or shawl for the head: when it is intended to be more distinguishing, a sword or a dagger is added.  To persons of distinction rich furs are given, such as a catabee or a coordee; but when the khilauts is complete..."
Image Source: 
Shoberl, Frederic. 'Persia: Containing a Description of the Country with an Account of Its Government, Laws, and Religion, and of the Character, Manners and Customs, Art, Amusements, Etc. of Its Inhabitants." Philadelphia: Grigg & Elliot, 1845.
Work Rights: 
Western Michigan University Libraries, Kalamazoo, Michigan, USA
Image Type: 
digital images
Image Format: 
image/tiff; image/jp2
Image Measurements: 
92,497,884 bytes
View Description: 
general views
Digital Publisher: 
Western Michigan University
Collection Title: 
Costume History Collection
Image Rights: 
Western Michigan University Libraries
Image Access: 
For use of digital image, contact Special Collections, Waldo Library, Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo, Michigan, USA 49008-5325
Image Identifier: 
EXWS_Cos_Sho_002